Welcome to the webpage of the Althaus laboratory.

 

Our group is based in the Department of Natural Sciences at Bonn-Rhein-Sieg University of Applied Sciences, Germany.

We investigate the molecular regulation of ion channels and transporters as well as the mechanisms of electrolyte and water transport processes across epithelial tissues.

RECENT RESEARCH NEWS

Transporters and symbiosis
A pH-sensitive ion channel
Pre-Conference Symposium
Rescheduled to 2021 due to Covid-19.
New roles for ion channels and transporters in health and disease

We were part of a study which was the first to identify and characterise an amino acid transporter required for amino acid exchange between the pea aphid  (Acyrthosiphon pisum) and its intracellular symbiont Buchnera aphidicola. The study was recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

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We recently discovered that an isoform of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in Xenopus laevis is highly sensitive to extracellular protons. This study has implications for molecular ENaC physiology and gives insight into ENaC evolution in vertebrates.

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We are excited to announce our symposium "New roles for ion channels and transporters in health and disease". Due to the current situation, this symposium will take place in advance of Physiology 2021 in Birmingham (UK).  Follow the link below to read about our sessions and invited speakers.

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Reef corals and airways?
Bird lung physiology
A protease-resistant ENaC

What do reef corals and airway epithelia have in common? Find out in an exciting multi-disciplinary review article published in npj Biofilms and Microbiomes.

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Our Stage 3 project student Mollie Morgan-Jones created nice stop motion animations explaining the respiratory system in birds. Watch here:

Episode 1 and Episode 2

We discovered that subunit composition critically determines protease sensitivity of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in Xenopus laevis.

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Activation of CFTR by hydrogen sulfide
O2-sensing in airway epithelia
Epithelial and Membrane Transport Symposium 2018

We dissected a mechanism by which the gas hydrogen sulfide interferes with cAMP signalling and stimulates the chloride channel CFTR in vitro.

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Together with Professor Kenneth Olson (Notre Dame University, USA) we revealed a novel mechanism for hypoxic inhibition of electrolyte transport in airway epithelia.

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The Epithelia and Membrane Transport Satellite Symposium in advance of Europhysiology 2018 was a great success. Read more about our exciting speakers and programme!

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